The Elusive Petroexoccipital Articulation

Title

The Elusive Petroexoccipital Articulation

Creator

Hershkovitz I; Latimer B; DuTour O; Jellema L M; Wish-Baratz S; Rothschild C; Rothschild B M

Publisher

American Journal of Physical Anthropology

Date

1997
1997-07

Description

In the present study, 1,869 skulls from the Hamann-Todd Collection were examined (macroscopically and by radiographs) for closure of the petroexoccipital articulation (jugular synchondrosis). The results demonstrated that the petroexoccipital articulation underwent closure between 20 and 50 years of age in most of the human skulls evaluated. Approximately 7-10% of the human skulls underwent complete union of the petroexoccipital articulation before 20 years of age. In 5-9% of the population, the joint remained completely open. After 50 years of age, there was no increase in the frequency of individuals with complete closure. The frequency of ''partial closure'' was similar (4-8%) for all age groups (20-25, 30-35, 40-45, 50-55, 60-65, and 70+), excluding the 30-35 year old group (17.5%). The time interval necessary for closure to occur appeared to be very short. No significant differences in closure rates due to ethnic origin, gender, or laterality were noted. The utility of the petroexoccipital articulation as an age estimator is discussed. (C) 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Subject

age identification; Anthropology; Evolutionary Biology; jugular synchondrosis; skull base

Format

Journal Article or Conference Abstract Publication

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Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

365-373

Issue

3

Volume

103

Citation

Hershkovitz I; Latimer B; DuTour O; Jellema L M; Wish-Baratz S; Rothschild C; Rothschild B M, “The Elusive Petroexoccipital Articulation,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed September 16, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/10174.

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