230. Molecular Typing of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates Collected at Mongolian Hospital (Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia).

Title

230. Molecular Typing of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates Collected at Mongolian Hospital (Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia).

Creator

Thapaliya Dipendra; Mackey Samantha; Kadariya Jhalka; Davaadash Bulgan; Smith Tara

Publisher

Open Forum Infectious Diseases

Date

2019
2019-10-02

Description

Background Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide causing an estimated 1.8 million cases and 517,000 deaths each year. S. pyogenes infections disproportionately affect low-income countries where routine surveillance is not available. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of clinically relevant S. pyogenes isolates in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, to better understand the burden in this under-served population. Methods Clinical S. pyogenes isolates (n = 41) collected at the Bacteriological Reference Laboratory, National Center for Communicable Diseases, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, were cultured and characterized using PCR techniques. The emm gene was sequenced and emm type was assigned as per Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) methods and guideline. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) was carried out on selected isolates (n = 15). Antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) was done via the Vitek-2 system as per manufacturer's instructions. Results We observed 18 distinct emm types among the 41 S. pyogenes isolates. stG6792.0 was the most common emm type, accounting for more than one-third of the isolates (15/41) followed by emm 2.0 (ST55) (5/41) and emm 82.0 (ST314) (2/41). A total of seven sequence types (STs) were detected among 15 tested isolates. The most common ST type was ST55 accounting for one-third of the isolates (5/15). Most of the isolates were susceptible to all tested drugs. Conclusion The findings of this study provided some insights regarding the molecular characteristics of S. pyogenes in Mongolia that will be crucial for future surveillance studies. Five isolates of this study had similar emm types (emm74.0, emm66.0, stG480.0, emm83.1, emm89.0) compared with a previous surveillance study. emm89.0 (ST101) was a major epidemiological isolate in the United States between 2000 and 2004. emm89.0 was also implicated with a recent single-clone outbreak in China. This information suggests the possibility of a shifting epidemiological trend of S. pyogenes on the global stage. The information about antibiotic susceptibility patterns and molecular types can help to devise better treatment strategies for S. pyogenes infections, and potentially inform vaccine development. Disclosures All authors: No reported disclosures. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Subject

mortality; epidemiology; antibiotic resistance; medical; surveillance; genes; bacterial; morbidity; infection; molecular; mongolia; antimicrobial susceptibility; china; communicable diseases; DRUG resistance in bacteria; LOW-income countries; disclosure; polymerase chain reaction; CENTERS for Disease Control & Prevention (U.S.); clone cells; communicable diseases; disease outbreaks; ichthyosis; low income; MOLECULAR epidemiology; mongolia; multi-antibiotic resistance; sequence tagged sites; sodium thiosulfate; streptococcus pyogenes; streptococcus pyogenes; TOXIC shock syndrome; ULAANBAATAR (Mongolia); vaccine development; x-linked

Format

Journal Article

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Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

S132-S133

Volume

6

ISSN

23288957

NEOMED College

NEOMED College of Medicine

NEOMED Department

NEOMED Student Publications

Citation

Thapaliya Dipendra; Mackey Samantha; Kadariya Jhalka; Davaadash Bulgan; Smith Tara, “230. Molecular Typing of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates Collected at Mongolian Hospital (Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia).,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed May 10, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/10853.

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