Specific Vagus Nerve Lesion Have Distinctive Physiologic Mechanisms of Dysphagia.

Title

Specific Vagus Nerve Lesion Have Distinctive Physiologic Mechanisms of Dysphagia.

Creator

Gould Francois D H; Lammers Andrew R; Mayerl Christopher J; German Rebecca Z

Publisher

Frontiers in neurology

Date

2019
1905-07

Description

Swallowing is complex at anatomical, functional, and neurological levels. The connections among these levels are poorly understood, yet they underpin mechanisms of swallowing pathology. The complexity of swallowing physiology means that multiple failure points may exist that lead to the same clinical diagnosis (e.g., aspiration). The superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) are branches of the vagus that innervate different structures involved in swallowing. Although they have distinct sensory fields, lesion of either nerve is associated clinically with increased aspiration. We tested the hypothesis that despite increased aspiration in both case, oropharyngeal kinematic changes and their relationship to aspiration would be different in RLN and SLN lesioned infant pigs. We compared movements of the tongue and epiglottis in swallows before and after either RLN or SLN lesion. We rated swallows for airway protection. Posterior tongue ratio of safe swallows changed in RLN (p = 0.01) but not SLN lesioned animals. Unsafe swallows post lesion had different posterior tongue ratios in RLN and SLN lesioned animals. Duration of epiglottal inversion shortened after lesion in SLN animals (p = 0.02) but remained unchanged in RLN animals. Thus, although SLN and RLN lesion lead to the same clinical outcome (increased aspiration), the mechanisms of failure of airway protection are different, which suggests that effective therapies may be different with each injury. Understanding the specific pathophysiology of swallowing associated with specific neural insults will help develop targeted, disease appropriate treatments.

Subject

Dysphagia; Animal model; Kinematics; Superior laryngeal nerve; recurrent laryngeal nerve

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Format

Journal Article

Search for Full-text

Users with a NEOMED Library login can search for full-text journal articles at the following url: https://libraryguides.neomed.edu/home

Pages

1301-1301

Volume

10

NEOMED College

NEOMED College of Medicine

NEOMED Department

Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology; NEOMED Postdoc Publications

Update Year & Number

March 2020 Update

Citation

Gould Francois D H; Lammers Andrew R; Mayerl Christopher J; German Rebecca Z, “Specific Vagus Nerve Lesion Have Distinctive Physiologic Mechanisms of Dysphagia.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed July 29, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/10967.

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