Masticatory Apparatus Performance and Functional Morphology in the Extremely Large Mice from Gough Island.

Title

Masticatory Apparatus Performance and Functional Morphology in the Extremely Large Mice from Gough Island.

Creator

Parmenter Michelle D; Nelson Jacob P; Weigel Sara E; Gray Melissa M; Payseur Bret A; Vinyard Christopher J

Publisher

Anatomical record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007)

Date

2018
2018-12

Description

Since their arrival approximately 200 years ago, the house mice (Mus musculus) on Gough Island (GI) rapidly increased in size to become the largest wild house mice on record. Along with this extreme increase in body size, GI mice adopted a predatory diet, consuming significant quantities of seabird chicks and eggs. We studied this natural experiment to determine how evolution of extreme size and a novel diet impacted masticatory apparatus performance and functional morphology in these mice. We measured maximum bite force and jaw opening (i.e., gape) along with several musculoskeletal dimensions functionally linked to these performance measurements to test the hypotheses that GI mice evolved larger bite forces and jaw gapes as part of their extreme increase in size and/or novel diet. GI mice can bite more forcefully and open their jaws wider than a representative mainland strain of house mice. Similarly, GI mice have musculoskeletal features of the masticatory apparatus that are absolutely larger than WSB mice. However, when considered relative to body size or jaw length, as a relevant mechanical standard, GI mice show reduced performance, suggesting a size-related decrease in these abilities. Correspondingly, most musculoskeletal features are not relatively larger in GI mice. Incisor biting leverage and condylar dimensions are exceptions, suggesting relative increases in biting efficiency and condylar rotation in GI mice. Based on these results, we hypothesize that evolutionary enhancements in masticatory performance are correlated with the extreme increase in body size and associated musculoskeletal phenotypes in Gough Island mice. Anat Rec, 2019. (c) 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Subject

biomechanics; biting; gape; islands; mandible

Identifier

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation

Parmenter Michelle D; Nelson Jacob P; Weigel Sara E; Gray Melissa M; Payseur Bret A; Vinyard Christopher J, “Masticatory Apparatus Performance and Functional Morphology in the Extremely Large Mice from Gough Island.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed March 4, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/2976.

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