Long-Lasting forward Suppression of Spontaneous Firing in Auditory Neurons: Implication to the Residual Inhibition of Tinnitus.

Title

Long-Lasting forward Suppression of Spontaneous Firing in Auditory Neurons: Implication to the Residual Inhibition of Tinnitus.

Creator

Galazyuk A V; Voytenko S V; Longenecker R J

Publisher

Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO

Date

2017
2017-04

Description

Tinnitus is the perception of a sound that has no external source. Sound stimuli can suppress spontaneous firing in auditory neurons long after stimulus offset. It is unknown how changes in sound stimulus parameters affect this forward suppression. Using in vivo extracellular recording in awake mice, we found that about 40 % of spontaneously active inferior colliculus (IC) neurons exhibited forward suppression of spontaneous activity after sound offset. The duration of this suppression increased with sound duration and lasted about 40 s following a

Subject

acoustic trauma; Animals; Brain Stem – Physiology; Clinical Assessment Tools; Cochlear Nerve – Physiology; Cochlear Nerve/*physiology; Inbred CBA; Inferior Colliculi/*physiology; inferior colliculus; Male; mice; Mice; residual inhibition; Sound; Tinnitus – Physiopathology; Tinnitus/*physiopathology

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

343–353

Issue

2

Volume

18

Citation

Galazyuk A V; Voytenko S V; Longenecker R J, “Long-Lasting forward Suppression of Spontaneous Firing in Auditory Neurons: Implication to the Residual Inhibition of Tinnitus.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed September 20, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/3218.

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