Simple Triage Algorithm and Rapid Treatment and Sort, Assess, Lifesaving, Interventions, Treatment, and Transportation mass casualty triage methods for sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values.

Title

Simple Triage Algorithm and Rapid Treatment and Sort, Assess, Lifesaving, Interventions, Treatment, and Transportation mass casualty triage methods for sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values.

Creator

Bhalla Mary Colleen; Frey Jennifer; Rider Cody; Nord Michael; Hegerhorst Mitch

Publisher

The American journal of emergency medicine

Date

2015
2015-11

Description

OBJECTIVE: Two common mass casualty triage algorithms are Simple Triage Algorithm and Rapid Treatment (START) and Sort, Assess, Lifesaving, Interventions, Treatment, and Transportation (SALT). We sought to determine the START and SALT efficacy in predicting clinical outcome by appropriate triage. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of trauma registry of patients from our emergency department (ED). We applied the triage algorithms to 100 patient charts. The end points categories were defined by patient outcomes and the need for intervention: minor/green, discharged without intervention other than minor ED procedure; delayed/yellow, patients get an intervention more than 12 hours after arrival to the ED; immediate/red, patients get an intervention less than 12 hours after arrival; dead/expectant/black, patients die within 48 hours after arrival. RESULTS: The mean age was 47 years (range, 17-92 years), and 72% were male. The mechanism of injury was 41% motor vehicle collision, 32% fall, and 16% penetrating trauma. Hospital outcome was 60% minor/green, 5% delayed/yellow, 29% immediate/red, and 6% dead/black. The SALT method resulted in 5 patients overtriaged (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-11.2), 30 undertriaged (95% CI, 21.2-40), and 65 met triage level (95% CI, 54.8-74.3). The START method resulted in 12 overtriage (95% CI, 6.4-20), 33 undertriaged (95% CI, 23.9-43.1), and 55 at triage level (95% CI, 44.7-65). Within triage levels, sensitivity ranged from 0% to 92%, specificity from 55% to 100%, positive predictive values from 10% to 100%, and negative predictive value from 65% to 97%. CONCLUSION: Overall, neither SALT nor START was sensitive or specific for predicting clinical outcome.

Subject

*Algorithms; *Emergency Service; *Mass Casualty Incidents; *Triage; 80 and over; 80 and Over; Adolescence; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Algorithms; Emergency Service; Female; Hospital; Humans; Male; Mass Casualty Incidents; Middle Age; Middle Aged; Pilot Projects; Pilot Studies; Predictive Value of Tests; Retrospective Design; Retrospective Studies; Scales; Triage; Wounds and Injuries – Diagnosis; Wounds and Injuries – Mortality; Wounds and Injuries – Therapy; Wounds and Injuries/*diagnosis/mortality/therapy; Young Adult

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

1687–1691

Issue

11

Volume

33

Citation

Bhalla Mary Colleen; Frey Jennifer; Rider Cody; Nord Michael; Hegerhorst Mitch, “Simple Triage Algorithm and Rapid Treatment and Sort, Assess, Lifesaving, Interventions, Treatment, and Transportation mass casualty triage methods for sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed May 15, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/3412.

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