The epidemiology of respiratory tract infections.

Title

The epidemiology of respiratory tract infections.

Creator

File T M

Publisher

Seminars in respiratory infections

Date

2000
2000-09

Description

Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are the most common, and potentially most severe, of infections treated by health care practitioners. Lower RTIs along with influenza, are the most common cause of death by infection in the United States. Risk factors for pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections include: extremes of age (very young and elderly), smoking, alcoholism, immunosuppression, and comorbid conditions. The microbial cause of RTIs vary depending on the infection (i.e., pneumonia compared with acute bacterial sinusitis), setting (i.e., community-acquired compared with nosocomial), and other factors. The causative pathogens associated with CAP have changed in prevalence over time. Although Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the most common causative pathogen, a number of newer pathogens, such as Chlamydia pneumoniae and sin nombre virus, have been recognized in recent years. The emerging antimicrobial resistance of respiratory pathogens (most notably S. pneumoniae) has also increased the challenge for appropriate management of RTI. An awareness of the epidemiology and cause of specific respiratory infections should optimize care.

Subject

80 and over; Adolescent; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Child; Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology; Cross Infection/epidemiology; Drug Resistance; Female; Humans; Incidence; Infant; Male; Microbial; Middle Aged; Newborn; Preschool; Respiratory Tract Diseases/*epidemiology/mortality/prevention & control; Risk Factors; United States/epidemiology

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

184–194

Issue

3

Volume

15

Citation

File T M, “The epidemiology of respiratory tract infections.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed June 19, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/4033.

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