Ethical principles contained in currently professed medical oaths.

Title

Ethical principles contained in currently professed medical oaths.

Creator

Dickstein E; Erlen J; Erlen J A

Publisher

Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Date

1991
1991-10

Description

This study analyzed the pledges received from all U.S. medical schools accredited in 1989 by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education of both the Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Medical Association to determine what pledges were affirmed and what ethical principles they contained. The Oath of Hippocrates was the most frequently affirmed pledge (the wording of which was used by 60 schools). Few oaths clearly demonstrated respect for patients' autonomy. The principle of veracity was not evident in any oath. However, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice were evident in half of the pledges, and confidentiality was included in three-fourths of them. The authors conclude that the medical oaths failed to address the changing doctor-patient relationship emerging in the 1990s, whereas they continued to affirm traditional principles of nonmaleficence and beneficence.

Subject

*Codes of Ethics; *Ethics; *Hippocratic Oath; Beneficence; Bioethics and Professional Ethics; Confidentiality; Empirical Approach; Humans; Medical; Patient Advocacy; Personal Autonomy; Physician-Patient Relations; Social Justice; United States

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

622–624

Issue

10

Volume

66

Citation

Dickstein E; Erlen J; Erlen J A, “Ethical principles contained in currently professed medical oaths.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed October 5, 2022, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/4220.

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