Incidence and epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy in the United States military: 2000 to 2009.

Title

Incidence and epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy in the United States military: 2000 to 2009.

Creator

Schoenfeld Andrew J; George Alan A; Bader Julia O; Caram Pedro M Jr

Publisher

Journal of spinal disorders & techniques

Date

2012
2012-02

Description

STUDY DESIGN: Epidemiological review of a prospectively collected military database. OBJECTIVE: This investigation sought to determine the incidence of cervical radiculopathy and risk factors for its development within the population of the United States military from 2000 to 2009. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Currently, the epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy remains poorly understood and risk factors for its development have not been reliably defined. METHODS: The military's Defense Medical Epidemiological Database was used to identify all servicemembers diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy (International Classification of Diseases code 723.4) between 2000 and 2009. Demographic data was obtained for all identified individuals including age group, sex, race, military rank, and branch of service. Like data was recorded for all servicemembers within the Armed Forces during the time period under study. The incidence of cervical radiculopathy was calculated and unadjusted incidence rate ratios were determined. Risk factors were analyzed by performing multivariate Poisson regression analysis, controlling for all other factors within the model. RESULTS: Between 2000 and 2009, about 24,742 individuals were diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy among a population-at-risk of 13,813,333, for an incidence of 1.79 per 1000 person-years. Statistically significant differences (P\textless0.001) in adjusted incidence rate ratios were identified for each successive age group with mutually exclusive 95% confidence intervals. Those age 40 years and above were found to have the greatest risk of cervical radiculopathy. Female sex (P\textless0.001), White race (P\textless0.001), senior positions within the rank structure (P\textless0.001), and service in the Army (P\textless0.001) or Air Force (P=0.01) were also identified as significant risk factors for cervical radiculopathy. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to attempt to define the incidence of cervical radiculopathy and characterize risk factors for its development within an American population. Findings presented here indicate that age is most likely the greatest risk factor for cervical radiculopathy, with female sex, White race, senior military positions, and Army or Air Force service also influencing risk to varying degrees.

Subject

*Military Personnel/statistics & numerical data; Adult; Age Factors; Cohort Studies; Databases; Factual; Female; Humans; Incidence; Male; Prospective Studies; Radiculopathy/diagnosis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; United States/epidemiology; Young Adult

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

17–22

Issue

1

Volume

25

Citation

Schoenfeld Andrew J; George Alan A; Bader Julia O; Caram Pedro M Jr, “Incidence and epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy in the United States military: 2000 to 2009.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed July 31, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/4347.

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