Evidence of Oropharyngeal Dysfunction in Feeding in the Rat Rotenone Model of Parkinson's Disease.

Title

Evidence of Oropharyngeal Dysfunction in Feeding in the Rat Rotenone Model of Parkinson's Disease.

Creator

Gould Francois D H; Gross Andrew; German Rebecca Z; Richardson Jason R

Publisher

Parkinson's disease

Date

2018
1905-07

Description

Swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease are not responsive to dopamine depletion therapy and contribute to morbidity. They are poorly understood owing to a lack of adequate models. We present the first evidence of oropharyngeal changes in a rotenone toxicity model of Parkinson's disease. Rats were recorded while feeding before and after daily rotenone injections at two different doses (2.75 mg/kg and 3 mg/kg). The higher dose had a much more severe parkinsonian phenotype than the low dose. Timing and amplitude of chewing changed, as did the coordination of chewing and swallowing. Dose-dependent effects were evident. These preliminary results indicate that future research in toxicological models of Parkinson's disease should incorporate the study of oropharyngeal dysfunction. A better understanding of nongenetic models of Parkinson's disease in feeding may open new avenues for research into the neurological and behavioral bases for swallowing dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

Subject

Animal Studies; Deglutition – Drug Effects; Deglutition Disorders; Eating – Drug Effects; Feeding Methods; Isoflavones – Administration and Dosage; Isoflavones – Pharmacodynamics; Mastication; Oropharynx – Pathology; Parkinson Disease; Phenotype; Rats

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

6537072–6537072

Volume

2018

Citation

Gould Francois D H; Gross Andrew; German Rebecca Z; Richardson Jason R, “Evidence of Oropharyngeal Dysfunction in Feeding in the Rat Rotenone Model of Parkinson's Disease.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed January 15, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/4711.

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