Trauma attending in the resuscitation room: does it affect outcome?

Title

Trauma attending in the resuscitation room: does it affect outcome?

Creator

Porter J M; Ursic C

Publisher

The American surgeon

Date

2001
2001-07

Description

Although there are no Class I data supporting the regionalization of trauma care the consensus is that trauma centers decrease morbidity and mortality. However, the controversy continues over whether trauma surgeons should be in-house or take call from home. The current literature does not answer the question because in all of the recent studies the attendings who took call from home were in the resuscitation room guiding the care. We believe the correct question is: Does the presence of the trauma attending in the resuscitation room make a difference? At a university-affiliated Level II trauma center data from the trauma registry, resuscitation room flowsheet, and dictated admission notes were reviewed on all patients over a 6-month period. Data points were: attending present in the resuscitation room, standard demographics, resuscitation room time, time to operating room (OR), time to CT scan, length of stay, complications, and mortality. A total of 943 patients were studied with 216 (23%) having the attending present in the resuscitation room and 727 (77%) without the attending present. The groups were similar in terms of age, sex, Injury Severity Score, percentage Injury Severity Score greater than 15 (16-17.1%), and mechanism of injury (24-29% penetrating). Of all the data points studied only time to the OR had a statistically significance difference (P \textless 0.05) with it taking 43.8 minutes (+/-20.1) when the attending was present and 109.4 minutes (+/-107) when the attending was absent. There were also no missed injuries, delays to the OR, or inappropriate workups when the attendings were present. Only the time to the OR reached statistical significance. The time to the OR is indicative of the decision-making process in the resuscitation room, and it is in this area that the attendings' presence is the most useful. Also, we believe that it is important that there were no missed injuries, delays to the OR, or inappropriate workups when the attendings were present in the resuscitation room. This again speaks to the decision-making process. We believe that these data support the need for the attending to be present in the resuscitation room to facilitate accurate and timely decisions regardless of whether they take the call from home or in-house.

Subject

Adult; Humans; Time Factors; Retrospective Studies; Workforce; Survival Rate; Quality of Health Care; *Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); *Resuscitation; *Trauma Centers; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling; Wounds and Injuries/mortality/therapy; Emergency Service; Hospital; Hospital/*statistics & numerical data; Medical Staff

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

611–614

Issue

7

Volume

67

Citation

Porter J M; Ursic C, “Trauma attending in the resuscitation room: does it affect outcome?,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed May 13, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/5580.

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