Role of 'atypical' pneumonia pathogens in respiratory tract infections.

Title

Role of 'atypical' pneumonia pathogens in respiratory tract infections.

Creator

Tan J S

Publisher

Canadian respiratory journal

Date

1999
1999-02

Description

The 'atypical' pathogens are important causes of pneumonia, causing illness ranging from mild to life-threatening. The most common atypical pathogens are Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae; others include Legionella species, Chlamydia psittaci and viruses such as influenza, adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus. Infection rates for these agents are difficult to determine because many clinicians and investigators do not routinely test for them, but reported rates are in the range of up to 8% (for C pneumoniae) and 15% to 20% (M pneumoniae) of all cases of pneumonia. Diagnostic testing is very difficult because most of these agents cannot be easily cultured. Diagnosis relies on either high acute antibody titres (quickly available but not very accurate) or paired serology samples (more accurate but requires at least a week). While rapid identification using automated polymerase chain reaction testing may be possible in the future, current management is based largely on empirical treatment.

Subject

Humans; Chlamydophila pneumoniae; Legionella pneumophila; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Immunoenzyme Techniques; Community-Acquired Infections; Chlamydia Infections; Pneumonia; Bacterial/diagnosis/*microbiology; Mycoplasma/diagnosis/*microbiology

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

15A–9A

Volume

6 Suppl A

Citation

Tan J S, “Role of 'atypical' pneumonia pathogens in respiratory tract infections.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed October 25, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/5660.

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