Herpes-simplex Virus - A Possible Etiologic Agent In Some Gastroduodenal Ulcer Disease

Title

Herpes-simplex Virus - A Possible Etiologic Agent In Some Gastroduodenal Ulcer Disease

Creator

Kemker B P; Docherty J J; Delucia A; Ruf W; Lewis R D

Publisher

American Surgeon

Date

1992
1992-12

Description

There is increasing evidence that the herpes simplex virus may account for some gastric ulcer disease. To examine this possibility, 62 tissue biopsies from 21 patients were obtained during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for gastroduodenal ulcer disease and from one operative specimen during the procedure for perforation of a gastric ulcer. The samples were collected form the base and rim of the ulcer, as well as from apparently healthy tissue adjacent to the lesion. When the DNA was extracted from these tissues and hybridized to a herpes simplex virus-specific DNA probe, Positive results were obtained with 9.5 per cent (2 out of 21) of the patients with benign ulcers. Positive signals were obtained only with ulcer-associated tissues and never with healthy tissue. Hybridization also occurred with DNA from one ulcerative carcinoma in the study. These data suggest that a subset of ulcer disease may be caused by herpes simplex virus or that this virus may be secondarily associating with these lesions.

Subject

antibodies; dna; peptic-ulcer; Surgery; type-1

Identifier

n/a

Format

Journal Article or Conference Abstract Publication

URL Address

n/a

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Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

775-778

Issue

12

Volume

58

Citation

Kemker B P; Docherty J J; Delucia A; Ruf W; Lewis R D, “Herpes-simplex Virus - A Possible Etiologic Agent In Some Gastroduodenal Ulcer Disease,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed May 12, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/10444.

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