The Role of Negative Affect on Headache-Related Disability Following Traumatic Physical Injury.

Title

The Role of Negative Affect on Headache-Related Disability Following Traumatic Physical Injury.

Creator

Pacella Maria L; Hruska Bryce; George Richard L; Delahanty Douglas L

Publisher

Headache

Date

2018
2018-03

Description

OBJECTIVE: Acute postinjury negative affect (NA) may contribute to headache pain following physical injury. Early psychiatric-headache comorbidity conveys increased vulnerability to chronic headache-related disability and impairment. Yet, it is unknown whether NA is involved in the transition to chronic headache related-disability after injury. This prospective observational study examined the role of acute postinjury NA on subacute and chronic headache-related disability above and beyond nonpsychiatric factors. METHODS: Eighty adult survivors of single-incident traumatic physical injury were assessed for negative affect (NA): a composite of depression and anxiety symptoms, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSS) during the acute 2-week postinjury phase. NA was examined as the primary predictor of subacute (6-week) and chronic (3-month) headache-related disability; secondary analyses examined whether the individual NA components differentially impacted the outcomes. RESULTS: Hierarchical linear regression confirmed NA as a unique predictor of subacute (Cohen's f (2) = 0.130; P = .005) and chronic headache related-disability (Cohen's f (2) = 0.160; P = .004) beyond demographic and injury-related factors (sex, prior headaches, and closed head injury). Upon further analysis, PTSS uniquely predicted greater subacute (Cohen's f (2) = 0.105; P = .012) and chronic headache-related disability (Cohen's f (2) = 0.103; P = .022) above and beyond demographic and injury-related factors, depression, and anxiety. Avoidance was a robust predictor of subacute headache impairment (explaining 15% of the variance) and hyperarousal was a robust predictor of chronic headache impairment (10% of the variance). CONCLUSION: Although NA consistently predicted headache-related disability, PTSS alone was a unique predictor above and beyond nonpsychiatric factors, depression, and anxiety. These results are suggestive that early treatment of acute postinjury PTSS may correlate with reductions in disability and negative physical health sequelae associated with PTSS and chronic headache.

Subject

Acute Disease – Etiology; ACUTE diseases; acute physical injury; Adult; Anxiety Disorders; ANXIETY disorders; Arousal; AROUSAL (Physiology); avoidance; Avoidance (Psychology); AVOIDANCE (Psychology); Chronic Pain; CHRONIC pain; Depression; Early Intervention; EARLY medical intervention; HEADACHE; Headache – Etiology; headache-related disability; Health Status; HEALTH status indicators; Human; hyperarousal; INJURY complications; Linear Regression; LONGITUDINAL method; MENTAL depression; negative affect; Nonexperimental Studies; OBSERVATION (Scientific method); Post-Traumatic; POST-traumatic stress disorder; Prospective Studies; PTSD symptoms; REGRESSION analysis; Secondary Analysis; SECONDARY analysis; Stress Disorders; Trauma – Complications

Identifier

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

381–398

Issue

3

Volume

58

Citation

Pacella Maria L; Hruska Bryce; George Richard L; Delahanty Douglas L, “The Role of Negative Affect on Headache-Related Disability Following Traumatic Physical Injury.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed September 23, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/4445.

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