Critical assessment of implantable drug delivery devices in glaucoma management.

Title

Critical assessment of implantable drug delivery devices in glaucoma management.

Creator

Manickavasagam Dharani; Oyewumi Moses O

Publisher

Journal of drug delivery

Date

2013
1905-07

Description

Glaucoma is a group of heterogeneous disorders involving progressive optic neuropathy that can culminate into visual impairment and irreversible blindness. Effective therapeutic interventions must address underlying vulnerability of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to degeneration in conjunction with correcting other associated risk factors (such as elevated intraocular pressure). However, realization of therapeutic outcomes is heavily dependent on suitable delivery system that can overcome myriads of anatomical and physiological barriers to intraocular drug delivery. Development of clinically viable sustained release systems in glaucoma is a widely recognized unmet need. In this regard, implantable delivery systems may relieve the burden of chronic drug administration while potentially ensuring high intraocular drug bioavailability. Presently there are no FDA-approved implantable drug delivery devices for glaucoma even though there are several ongoing clinical studies. The paper critically assessed the prospects of polymeric implantable delivery systems in glaucoma while identifying factors that can dictate (a) patient tolerability and acceptance, (b) drug stability and drug release profiles, (c) therapeutic efficacy, and (d) toxicity and biocompatibility. The information gathered could be useful in future research and development efforts on implantable delivery systems in glaucoma.

Identifier

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

895013–895013

Volume

2013

Citation

Manickavasagam Dharani; Oyewumi Moses O, “Critical assessment of implantable drug delivery devices in glaucoma management.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed September 25, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/4695.

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