Long-Term Sequela of Intrathecal Gadolinium Extravasation: Symptoms Mimicking Post-concussive Syndrome

Title

Long-Term Sequela of Intrathecal Gadolinium Extravasation: Symptoms Mimicking Post-concussive Syndrome

Creator

Patel A; Zolyan A; Itrat A

Publisher

Cureus

Date

2021
2021-03-24

Description

Gadolinium contrast administration, usually with magnetic resonance imaging, is an important diagnostic modality in the investigation of neurological pathologies. There is little evidence in the literature suggesting repeated exposure to intrathecal gadolinium results in symptoms mimicking post-concussive syndrome (PCS). We studied one patient who received intrathecal gadolinium to investigate a pain pump malfunction and presented with encephalopathic symptoms of confusion and aphasia with imaging consistent with intracranial gadolinium extravasation. The patient was followed up regularly with repeat imaging, reassessment of persistent symptoms, and specialist evaluations; however, symptoms remained refractory and resembled PCS. Our findings indicate a need to further investigate potential associations between intrathecal gadolinium exposure and a clinical presentation consistent with PCS, irrespective of histopathological changes.

Subject

toxicity; neurology; radiology; gadolinium; neuroradiology; post-concussive syndrome; toxic encephalopathy

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Format

journalArticle

Search for Full-text

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Issue

3

Volume

13

NEOMED College

NEOMED College of Medicine

NEOMED Department

NEOMED Student Publications
Department fo Internal Medicine

Update Year & Number

May 2021 List

Citation

Patel A; Zolyan A; Itrat A, “Long-Term Sequela of Intrathecal Gadolinium Extravasation: Symptoms Mimicking Post-concussive Syndrome,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed September 23, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/11658.

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