Oestrogen and nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration: animal models and clinical reports of Parkinson's disease.

Title

Oestrogen and nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration: animal models and clinical reports of Parkinson's disease.

Creator

Liu Bin; Dluzen Dean E

Publisher

Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology

Date

2007
2007-07

Description

1. The exact nature of oestrogen (positive, negative or no effect) in the dopaminergic neurodegenerative disorder Parkinson's disease is controversial. 2. In the present review, we summarize the data on oestrogen and nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration in animal models and clinical reports of Parkinson's disease. 3. Most animal studies support the ability of oestrogen to function as a neuroprotectant against neurotoxins that target the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. 4. Retrospective and prospective clinical studies generally support the findings from animal studies that oestrogen exerts a positive, or, at worst, no effect, in Parkinson's disease. 5. Oestrogen was chosen as one of the 12 neuroprotective compounds to be attractive candidates for further clinical trials (Phase II or III) in 2003.

Subject

Animal; Animals; Basal Ganglia/drug effects/*metabolism/pathology; Disease Models; Dopamine/*metabolism; Estrogens/*metabolism/pharmacology/therapeutic use; Humans; Nerve Degeneration/drug therapy/*metabolism/pathology; Neurons/metabolism/pathology; Neuroprotective Agents/*metabolism/pharmacology/therapeutic use; Parkinson Disease/drug therapy/*metabolism/pathology; Parkinsonian Disorders/drug therapy/*metabolism/pathology; Substantia Nigra/drug effects/*metabolism/pathology

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

555–565

Issue

7

Volume

34

Citation

Liu Bin; Dluzen Dean E, “Oestrogen and nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration: animal models and clinical reports of Parkinson's disease.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed April 18, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/4455.

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