Phenobarbital pre-treatment prevents kainic acid-induced impairments in acquisition learning.

Title

Phenobarbital pre-treatment prevents kainic acid-induced impairments in acquisition learning.

Creator

Brown-Croyts L M; Caton P W; Radecki D T; McPherson S L

Publisher

Life sciences

Date

2000
2000-06

Description

This study examined the protective effect of phenobarbital on kainic acid-induced deficits in acquisition learning. A single kainic acid injection (9 mg/kg i.p.) was administered five days prior to testing using the Morris water maze test. Kainic acid produced deficits in the acquisition of spatial information observed as an increase in latency to a hidden escape platform. Daily phenobarbital treatment (20 mg/kg i.p.) initiated 45 minutes prior to the kainic acid injection blocked the kainic acid-induced deficits in acquisition learning. When daily phenobarbital treatment was initiated 2-3 hours after kainic acid seizure development it did not block the kainic acid induced-deficits in water maze performance. Daily administration of phenobarbital alone at the moderate concentration used in this study did not cause alterations in behavioral performance in the Morris water maze. These studies indicate that phenobarbital pre-treatment results in a behavioral neuroprotection against kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity.

Subject

Animal/drug effects; Animals; Behavior; Cues; Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists/*toxicity; GABA Modulators/*pharmacology; Kainic Acid/*antagonists & inhibitors/*toxicity; Learning/drug effects; Long-Evans; Male; Maze Learning/*drug effects; Memory/drug effects; Phenobarbital/*pharmacology; Rats; Seizures/chemically induced/prevention & control

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

643–650

Issue

6

Volume

67

Citation

Brown-Croyts L M; Caton P W; Radecki D T; McPherson S L, “Phenobarbital pre-treatment prevents kainic acid-induced impairments in acquisition learning.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed April 15, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/3852.

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