Mohs fixed-tissue excision of dentoalveolar bone in canines: a histologic evaluation.

Title

Mohs fixed-tissue excision of dentoalveolar bone in canines: a histologic evaluation.

Creator

Stultz T W; Vidimos A T; Bailin P L; Rossi E P

Publisher

Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

Date

1993
1993-01

Description

Mohs surgery is a well-established surgical technique that involves conservative, microscopically guided excision of malignant lesions, thereby sparing the maximum amount of normal surrounding tissue. Current surgical therapy for oral cancer frequently involves resection with wide margins, resulting in significant cosmetic and functional deficits. This pilot study used the Mohs technique for in situ fixation and excision of maxillary and mandibular bone in mongrel dogs. Histologic examination of the excisional sites was carried out at 8 weeks to examine changes in the surrounding bone, periodontal ligament, and dental pulp of adjacent teeth. The findings suggest that zinc chloride fixative paste does not result in destruction of the dental pulp or surrounding dentoalveolar bone of teeth in the vicinity of a fixed-tissue excision. The Mohs fixed-tissue technique may allow preservation of oral structures that would otherwise be sacrificed in the presence of bony tumor involvement.

Subject

*Mohs Surgery; *Orthognathic Surgical Procedures; *Zinc Compounds; Alveolar Process/drug effects; Animals; Chlorides/toxicity; Dental Pulp/drug effects; Dogs; Periodontal Dressings; Pilot Projects; Surgical Flaps; Zinc/toxicity

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

39–43; discussion 44

Issue

1

Volume

51

Citation

Stultz T W; Vidimos A T; Bailin P L; Rossi E P, “Mohs fixed-tissue excision of dentoalveolar bone in canines: a histologic evaluation.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed July 30, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/3915.

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