Ethanol discrimination in Fawn-Hooded rats is compromised when compared to other strains.

Title

Ethanol discrimination in Fawn-Hooded rats is compromised when compared to other strains.

Creator

Schechter M D; Meehan S M

Publisher

Alcohol (Fayetteville, N.Y.)

Date

1993
1993-02

Description

The drug discrimination paradigm was used to evaluate the behavioral differences in response to ethanol between three strains of rats, viz., Sprague-Dawley, N/Nih and Fawn-Hooded. This latter group is thought to have a genetically-transmitted diminished central serotonin function. Each group of rats was trained to discriminate between the stimulus properties of 600 mg/kg ethanol and its vehicle in a two-lever, food-motivated operant task. Results indicate that the Fawn-Hooded rats required a significantly longer time and a higher ethanol dose to reach criterion discrimination performance. Furthermore, the ED50 value of the Fawn-Hooded rats, once trained, was higher than the Sprague-Dawley or N/Nih rats. The possibility that a reciprocal relationship exists between lowered central serotonin concentrations and higher alcohol consumption is suggested and the hypothesis that the diminished ability to recognize the interoceptive stimuli produced by ethanol may result in larger amounts of ethanol being consumed is offered.

Subject

*Discrimination Learning; Animals; Dose-Response Relationship; Drug; Ethanol/*pharmacology; Male; Rats; Serotonin/physiology; Species Specificity; Sprague-Dawley

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

77–81

Issue

1

Volume

10

Citation

Schechter M D; Meehan S M, “Ethanol discrimination in Fawn-Hooded rats is compromised when compared to other strains.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed June 12, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/3386.

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