High Body Mass Index in Infancy May Predict Severe Obesity in Early Childhood.

Title

High Body Mass Index in Infancy May Predict Severe Obesity in Early Childhood.

Creator

Smego Allison; Woo Jessica G; Klein Jillian; Suh Christina; Bansal Danesh; Bliss Sherri; Daniels Stephen R; Bolling Christopher; Crimmins Nancy A

Publisher

The Journal of pediatrics

Date

2017
2017-04

Description

OBJECTIVE: To characterize growth trajectories of children who develop severe obesity by age 6 years and identify clinical thresholds for detection of high-risk children before the onset of obesity. STUDY DESIGN: Two lean (body mass index [BMI] 5th to /=99th percentile) groups were selected from populations treated at pediatric referral and primary care clinics. A population-based cohort was used to validate the utility of identified risk thresholds. Repeated-measures mixed modeling and logistic regression were used for analysis. RESULTS: A total of 783 participants of normal weight and 480 participants with severe obesity were included in the initial study. BMI differed significantly between the severely obese and normal-weight cohorts by age 4 months (P \textless .001), at 1 year before the median age at onset of obesity. A cutoff of the World Health Organization (WHO) 85th percentile for BMI at 6, 12, and 18 months was a strong predictor of severe obesity by age 6 years (sensitivity, 51%-95%; specificity, 95%). This BMI threshold was validated in a second independent cohort (n = 2649), with a sensitivity of 33%-77% and a specificity of 74%-87%. A BMI \textgreater/=85th percentile in infancy increases the risk of severe obesity by age 6 years by 2.5-fold and the risk of clinical obesity by age 6 years by 3-fold. CONCLUSIONS: BMI trajectories in children who develop severe obesity by age 6 years differ from those in children who remain at normal weight by age 4-6 months, before the onset of obesity. Infants with a WHO BMI \textgreater/=85th percentile are at increased risk for developing severe obesity by age 6 years.

Subject

*BMI percentile; *Body Mass Index; *infant growth; *obese; *weight for length; Age Factors; Body Mass Index; Case Control Studies; Case-Control Studies; Child; Comparative Studies; Evaluation Research; Female; Human; Humans; Incidence; Infant; Logistic Models; Logistic Regression; Male; Morbid – Diagnosis; Morbid – Epidemiology; Morbid/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Multicenter Studies; Newborn; Obesity; Obesity – Diagnosis; Obesity – Epidemiology; Obesity/diagnosis/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Preschool; Reference Values; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Assessment; Scales; Sex Factors; Validation Studies; Weight Gain

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Pages

87–93.e1

Volume

183

Citation

Smego Allison; Woo Jessica G; Klein Jillian; Suh Christina; Bansal Danesh; Bliss Sherri; Daniels Stephen R; Bolling Christopher; Crimmins Nancy A, “High Body Mass Index in Infancy May Predict Severe Obesity in Early Childhood.,” NEOMED Bibliography Database, accessed June 20, 2021, https://neomed.omeka.net/items/show/3679.

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